Guest iin London

guest_in_london10_1c

 

Matrudevobhava, Pitrudevobhava, Acharyadevobhava, Athithidevobhava

 

When you working towards an image, it is advised to act in as many different roles as possible. Once you have the image, the advice is juxtaposed and you are asked to act in as similar roles as possible in an effort to maintain the image.

 

Paresh Rawal has acted in several brilliant movies. He delivered in each of those movies. He grew as an actor in each of these movies. His oeuvre consists of various roles, but after Hera Pheri, the performer has been overtaken by the entertainer.

 

Guest iin London is what happens when you attempt a sequel packaged as franchise. Of course, Paresh Rawal is a much better choice for a role in a franchise -series than the two actors we have gotten  used to seeing over the years (Dhoom, anyone?)

 

The movie starts off with the antics of Paresh Rawal in a long flight. The montage does seem funny at the beginning but the effect wears off as you see more of it. That’s pretty much the case with the movie too.

 

The plot is simple. Paresh Rawal and Tanvi Azmi, as guests, land up at Karthik Aaryan’s house unaanounced and unwanted. How they go about setting up his life and gradually, creating a few problems in his life is what the movie is all about. Probably they chose Karthik Aaryan because he has no one to call upon as his own and wants to settle down in UK; the reason why approaches Kriti Kharbanda to marry him and leave him after a while, for a price of course – cue for some sexual innuendo. There is a lot of talk about sex in the movie: Viagra, sexual harassment, the farts of your lover smelling like a rose (Yes, that is a line in an extended paean about farts)

The bit about farts by Paresh Rawal is so overdone that you are saying sorry to yourself, the same way in which Paresh Rawal says sorry to Karthik’s boss, for putting yourself through it. The only time it seems genuinely funny is when Karthik and Kriti dream of them as Al-Qaeeda operatives and even while shooting them, Paresh Rawal farts and Tanvi Azmi says ‘kya hain na, inko pet ka problem hain’ like always.

The way Paresh Rawal goes about makes you feel that he wants to strip himself of all the acting credentials. A man who has given so many brilliant performances seems a shadow of himself here and is reduced to rabble-rousing. He falls to ground zero (metaphorical, geographical and literal) before redeeming himself. His conversations with Sanjay Mishra’s Pakistani character are what wet dreams of his political critics made of. They are below the belt, unwanted and frequent. That this movie will go unnoticed by many will be a blessing for the actor as well as the politician.

Tanvi Azmi of Guest iin London is unrecognizable from the Tanvi Azmi of Akele Hum Akele Tum, Yeh Jawaani hain Deewani. Once you have seen the movie, come back home and watch the scene from Akele Hum Akele Tum where she pleads Manisha Koirala to come back into Aamir Khan’s life. That is what the lady is capable of and she is wasted in this movie. That, according to me is criminal. She says ‘Kya hain na inka pet kharab hain’ in the movie more than anything else.

 

Karthik Aaryan, the man who apocryphally delivered the monologue in Pyaar Ka Punchnama in a single shot, does well, but like Kriti Kharbanda, he has big shoes to fill. It’s essentially his tale, but it seems anything but his tale. Kriti Kharbanda stars in the movie and that’s pretty much it.

 

The movie is shot indoors for most part but when it goes outdoors, the poor camerawork shows. Even indoors, the lighting seems poor for most part. When you see the work of the actors and technicians, it seems to be a movie made in a hurry.

 

Verdict: You can go to sleep and come back once the movie finishes 

Image Courtesy: indiaglitz.com

An edited version of this post appeared in fullhyd.com

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